Arugula

Package: 50g / 1 pack

¥220

Description

Known under a lot of different names such as garden rocket, rocket salad, roka, roquette, rucola or rugula, Arugula is a Eurasian annual herb of the mustard family. The leaves have a peppery, spicy flavor that grows more bitter with age. You can also eat the seeds whole or pressed in an oil. The Latin adjective sativa in the plant's binomial name is derived from satum, the supine of the verb sero, meaning "to sow", indicating that the seeds of the plant were sown in gardens.

Characteristics

Eruca vesicaria

Botanical Name

Brassica

Family

Mediterranean region, from Morocco and Portugal in the west to Syria, Lebanon, and Turkey in the east. Grown as an edible and popular herb in Italy since Roman times, it was mentioned by various ancient Roman classical authors as an aphrodisiac, most famously in a poem long ascribed to the famous 1st century Roman poet Virgil, Moretum, which contains the line: "et Venerem revocans eruca morantem" ("and the rocket, which revives drowsy Venus [sexual desire]"), and in the Ars Amatoria of Ovid. Some writers assert that for this reason during the Middle Ages it was forbidden to grow rocket in monasteries. It was listed, however, in a decree by The holy Roman emperor Charlemagne of 802 as one of the pot herbs suitable for growing in gardens.

Origin

Early Spring and late Summer

Sowing Month

Summer and Fall

Harvest Month

Health Benefits

Arugula is full of antioxidants, compounds that can protect against or reverse damage to your cells.

Arugula also has glucosinolates. These natural substances, which give arugula its bitter taste and strong scent, may protect you against certain cancers, including breast, prostate, lung, and colon cancers. Arugula may also fight inflammation. It has ample vitamin K, which is good for your bones and may help prevent osteoporosis. It also contains Calcium, Potassium, Folate (a vitamine B), vitamine A and C.

Cooking Tips

As a pizza or baked potato topping, in pasta, in salads, in soups and sauces, instead of lettuce in sandwiches and in omelets or smoothies